APT Review: ‘Smart People’ takes on race, sexuality, status

The issues of race and sexuality are ones that often spark strong feelings and heavy debates amongst many people across the world. These issues are, and have always been, pertinent topics to discuss and understand, especially now, as the world is becoming a more diverse, and hopefully, welcoming place. With this in mind, I was excited to watch the American Players Theatre’s performance of Lydia R. Diamond’s play, “Smart People” directed by Melisa Pereyra. This will be the last piece in their “Out of the Woods” series. Focusing on the issues of race, socio-economic status, sexuality, and identity as a whole, Diamond pieces together short scenes involving a variety of characters, as well as monologues, sometimes simultaneously. Working with the limitations posed by the Zoom format, elements such as reading stage directions aloud, adding sound effects and showing maps to set the scene, allows the audience to make sense of the direction of the play.

APT Review: APT portrays historical figure, philosophy

Amongst the excitement and angst of the election, American Players Theatre (APT) provided the perfect distraction with Karen Zacarías’ play, “The Sins of Sor Juana”. Directed by Jake Penner and starring an all-LatinX cast, this Zoom-mediated play reading transcends the limitations of video conference calling. The chemistry emitted from the cast is palpable as they brilliantly utilize elements of comedy, romance, and tragedy to convey the plot of the story through its style of magical realism.

Review: APT portrays historical feminist writer virtually

Amongst the excitement and angst of the election, American Players Theatre (APT) provided the perfect distraction with Karen Zacarías’ play, “The Sins of Sor Juana”. Directed by Jake Penner and starring an all-LatinX cast, this Zoom-mediated play reading transcends the limitations of video conference calling. The chemistry emitted from the cast is palpable as they brilliantly utilize elements of comedy, romance, and tragedy to convey the plot of the story through its style of magical realism.